Never be afraid to trust an unknown future to a known God.

Corrie ten Boom

Corrie ten Boom was famous for writing her family’s story during the Holocaust. The book, The Hiding Place, came out in 1971, and the movie followed in 1975. Wikipedia

Corrie ten Boom book covers The Hiding Place

A Time and Place for Faith

Corrie ten Boom spoke from a the roof of a drive-in movie theater snack shack in probably 1972 or 1973 in Portland, Oregon. As she spoke, I listened in the privacy of a friend’s car through the loudspeaker hanging on the driver’s window.

I didn’t know too much about the Holocaust at the time I heard Corrie ten Boom. My father did not fight in the war because of a disability. History doesn’t officially become history – in textbooks – until 25 years after the event. That meant that the end of World War II wasn’t officially history until after I graduated from high school. I listened blindly, to her story of faith, without even reading her book first.

The day she spoke it probably was raining, at least drizzling, it usually was during winter months. Corrie ten Boom was a short, plump older woman, and she sat on a high stool so people in their cars could see her. The pastor held a big, black umbrella over her head to keep her dry. Cars honked and blinked their headlights to welcome her.

She spoke for about twenty minutes telling us the story of how her family defied the Nazi’s by hiding and protecting Jews and Resistance leaders in their home. I remember being impressed with hers and her family’s faith and their determination not to be dominated by fear. Instead, they did what they felt God wanted them to do.

Even after they were arrested and sent to concentration camps under deplorable conditions, they continued to trust God rather than fear their persecutors. During those cold, damp twenty minutes on the snack shack roof, she did not dwell as much on the horrors of the Holocaust. She impressed on us, as we sat in the warmth of our cars, of the hope that she and her sister tried to share with the other prisoners as they leaned against each other in the bunks to try to sleep.

She told of many miracles. But the miracles did not save her sister’s or her father’s lives. The pastor and his wife put their arms around her back and stood close to her to keep her warm. She did not sound bitter about what happened to her and her family. Of course, she was sad especially that her sister died, but amazed and baffled that she survived. She told us that she trusted that there was a reason that she lived and the rest of her family did not. She said that her sister had more faith. Yet, it was Corrie that lived to tell the story on the cool day from the roof of the 82nd Street Drive-In snack shack in Portland Oregon

Great tragedies need and produce great faith and can inspire others to call on faith during their own times of tragedies. New Hope Community Church exposed us as young people to many speakers like Corrie ten Boom who shared their faith with us. It was an amazing time in my life.

We all die. We all lose people that are important to us. We get sick, lose jobs, go broke, and have unwanted responsibilities thrust on us. We face fear, and people who hate us for no reason. But we can all face our tragedies with faith. And in doing that, there is an inexplicable joy that bubbles up in us.

Do you have a story of faith you’d like to share?

Thank you to those who shared their Inspiring stories of Fitness last week.


36 responses to “#WQWWC #20: Faith, Trust, Belief, Hope, Expectation”

  1. katiesencouragementforyou Avatar

    I really enjoyed reading your story. I searched for other stories about Corrie Ten Boom, as I had written one about her as well. Here is the link to mine, if you’d like to read it. https://katiesencouragementforyou.home.blog/2021/06/16/corrie-ten-boom/ Blessings!!

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  4. Bear Avatar

    I remember seeing the movie as a teenager. It was profound and really touched my heart deeply. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha Avatar

      Thanks for reading and commenting. It was an amazing experience for me.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Natalie Avatar

    Marsha, What a powerful experience you had listening to Corrie. Have you read “The Choice -Embracing the possible” by Dr. Edith Eger? Her story is powerful, too. Thank you for joining #WeekendCoffeeShare

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha Avatar

      I have not read that, but I will check it out. I love your reading list, Natalie. 🙂

      Like

    1. Marsha Avatar

      Beautiful but sad story, Sadje. You and your faith have forged a beautiful life for yourself. Not many people go through what you’ve been through and none of them without scratches. You are an amazing woman. I will comment and like your post when I can get on a computer again. 🥰🥰🥰

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje Avatar

        Thank you Marsha! You’re very kind

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Marsha Avatar

          Thanks again for sharing, Sadje.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Sadje Avatar

            It’s a pleasure

            Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha Avatar

      Thanks for the link, Sadje.

      Like

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  7. hopewellslibraryoflife Avatar

    How wonderful that you got to be there and here her!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marsha Avatar

      It was very awesome. I’ll never forget it even though it was a million years ago.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. hopewellslibraryoflife Avatar

        I listened to her book with my teenage son several years ago–it was my first time reading it. We were both so amazed at how she gave thanks for the fleas because they kept the guards out of the barracks. Wow.

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Marsha Avatar

          You’ve read it more recently than I, but those are the kind of stories she shared. Very positive!

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  8. Sadje Avatar

    Thanks for the mention Marsha. It’s a profound topic. I’ll join in with my post tomorrow

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Marsha Avatar

      Thanks, Sadje. How are you doing with your fast? It’s been almost a week.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sadje Avatar

        You’re welcome! Yesterday was the first day. It went very well. Let’s see hope the rest of the month goes.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Marsha Avatar

          I’m so glad. The first day should be the worst. After that you lose your hunger. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Sadje Avatar

            I’m hoping that it will go well. It has health benefits and spiritual benefits too.

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Marsha Avatar

            Yes, fasting is a spiritual exercise in so many religions. It helps us focus on what is important.

            Liked by 1 person

          3. Sadje Avatar

            Yes, exactly. Thanks Marsha.

            Liked by 1 person

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  10. KL Caley Avatar

    Wow. Great post. KL ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marsha Avatar

      Thank you KL. The amazing stories we all have tucked inside of us that just need a venue to reappear. Right? What’s been tucked in your brain that needs a reason to come out?

      Liked by 2 people

  11. kirstin troyer Avatar

    Love this Marsha. I haven’t read any of Corrie’s books. What an awesome memory you have. Did you grow up in Portland? I live 30 minutes north of Portland now and we spend a lot of time there…so much so that we joke we should be washington and Oregon citizens.

    https://troyerslovinglife.blogspot.com/2021/04/wqwwcapril-14th-themefaith.html

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Marsha Avatar

      We moved from Indiana to Portland when my parents separated. I lived there for about 9 years. I loved it, and my brother still lives there.

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      1. Kevin and Kirstin Troyer Avatar

        Okay, I think I remember you saying your brother still lived there. My FIL was born and raised in Indiana. My hubby and brother were born there as well, and then moved to Washington when they were in grade school. They lived in Goshen, IN.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Marsha Avatar

          What a small world, Kristin! I think that’s close to Indianspolis where we lived.

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          1. Kirstin Avatar

            Definitely a small world. We loved visiting there once we were married. I love the Amish community in the area and seeing the countryside.

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Marsha Avatar

            It is a small world, indeed, Kirstin. 🙂

            Like

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